Abundanjah

Jul 29

the horse (or oxen) = the way of the future

the horse (or oxen) = the way of the future

Post Carbon Tool: The Chainsaw. What!! The most controversial of the tools. Way to much power for one person. But nobody these days would ever think about using an axe and saw to put up wood for the winter. The chainsaw may be here until the bitter end. I shouldn’t get to used to this one. 

Post Carbon Tool: The Chainsaw. What!! The most controversial of the tools. Way to much power for one person. But nobody these days would ever think about using an axe and saw to put up wood for the winter. The chainsaw may be here until the bitter end. I shouldn’t get to used to this one. 

Post Carbon Tool: The Garden Fork. Ah yes, this must be the most used tool on the farm. How else can you prepare the ground for planting without fossil fuels. And further regarding blacksmithing, I think we need more local cottage industries producing hand tools, starting with the garden fork. So get yours!

Post Carbon Tool: The Garden Fork. Ah yes, this must be the most used tool on the farm. How else can you prepare the ground for planting without fossil fuels. And further regarding blacksmithing, I think we need more local cottage industries producing hand tools, starting with the garden fork. So get yours!

Jul 25

Post Carbon Skill: Blacksmithing

Post Carbon Skill: Blacksmithing

Jul 19

[video]

Jul 15

“Tidiness is something that happens when you have frontal brain damage. You get very tidy. Tidiness is symptomatic of brain damage. Creativity, on the other hand, is symptomatic of a fairly whole brain, and is usually a disordered affair. The tolerance for disorder is one of the very few healthy signs in life. If you can tolerate disorder, you are probably healthy. Creativity is seldom tidy.” — Bill Mollison, Introduction to Permaculture (via puttheneedleon)

(Source: cinematrappiste)

Voluntary poverty -- it could save your life, but it's a hard sell | Energy Bulletin -

I think it’s time to go monk. 

Jul 05

How many energy slaves does it take to screw in a lightbulb?

The concept of energy slaves has been on my mind since arriving here, being a topic of conversation daily. But now with haying season at hand, I must get it off my chest. You can think of an energy slave as simply the amount of humans needed to accomplish a specific task. Or the amount of slaves we need to live our daily, lazy assed, overweight, spoiled lives (harsh?). Some estimate an incredible 400 slaves each, making slavery more prevalent today that ever before in history, but at the expense of our dear planet. Ok, lets bring this back to hay, a beautiful perennial crop. Our hay grows year after year on the same spot, adding compost and occasionally lime. The hay just grows, tall and proud, ready for our harvesting. Once harvested, this hay goes into the barn to keep our two goats, two draft horses, and one mildly drunk pony through the winter (and perhaps for all you permaculture mulchers out there). Sounds pretty simple… some logistics to boot. The tractor has to pass over the field several times, with several different implements: The sickle bar mower comes first, then the tedder passes over a couple times, over a couple days, to help fluff dry the downed grass into hay, after two or three days windrows are made, next comes the square baler to gobble up the loose mess into tight gifts. And finally the hay wagon is attached and the festivities begin, tossing bales up, stacked neatly, then unstacked, and then stacked neatly again into the barn. And that’s easy work, a true industrial luxury! I ask myself how many slaves would be needed to accomplish this task without our precious diesel fuel?! I can’t quite comprehend the amount: with the kilo joules of energy burned plus the embodied energy of the tractor and implements, amortization, etc, etc, but I assure you that its an amount that really worries me about the future.

But it can be done, or has been done quite successfully in the past. The so important idea of scale comes to mind, we need way more than 2% feeding the 98%. 

And so how many energy slaves does it take to screw in a light bulb?

Edible Toronto Article -

by friend and fellow intern last year at Whole Circle Farm. Nice one, Peter!

Jun 22

Post Carbon Tool: Japenese Scythe. Controlling undesirable weeds in the forest garden and having fun. 

Post Carbon Tool: Japenese Scythe. Controlling undesirable weeds in the forest garden and having fun.